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November 10, 2020

Local companies promote cybersecurity

Local companies are becoming a member of a statewide initiative to raise consciousness about cyber threats to local companies and train business owners about steps they can take to defend themselves.

Ptolemy Data Systems Chief Operating Officer Jesus Rios said he and Tyler Neeriemer, the IT Administrator for First Federal Bank and Trust, started growing techniques to train local companies about cyber protection when it has become clear there has been a loss of consciousness on the topic within the network.

“It’s meant to be an academic outreach attempt to make certain that people have only a working language of, what are the dangers and what are the ways to mitigate danger?” Rios said. “The key for us become, we wanted people to get something out of it that they may follow in their daily paintings surroundings.”

The pair has partnered with Made Safe in Wyoming, a set affiliated with the country broad cybersecurity initiative CyberUSA, to broaden workshops and educational seminars approximately cybersecurity practices.

Laura Baker, co-founding father of Made Safe in Wyoming, stated the local attempt fits in with her organization’s broader assignment to promote cybersecurity across the nation.

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“We’re trying to determine out approaches to bring network involvement and community awareness into cybersecurity,” Baker stated.

“…We demystify cybersecurity for (groups) and educate them basic equipment they could use to shield their agency.”

For small companies, improving cybersecurity does no longer necessarily require imposing technical solutions like hiring more IT team of workers or installing strong firewalls.

According to the Federal Bureau of Investigation’s Internet Crimes Complaint Center, Wyoming lost greater than $2.3 million to net-related crimes in 2017. Significantly, the maximum of those crimes were cases of fraud because of a loss of education instead of insufficient technical protections. The FBI’s database additionally suggests that humans older than 50 are more likely to be the victims of cyber crimes than more youthful demographics.

“A lot of its far education — knowing what not to click on, remembering to trade your passwords and that kind of element,” Baker stated.

Rios stated he and Neeriemer want to gear nearby training efforts toward enforcing no-value precautions to significantly lessen an enterprise’s probabilities of being hacked. For instance, hackers will frequently try and advantage a foothold in a network through social engineering, a tactic used to manipulate human beings into divulging sensitive facts or growing vulnerabilities of their cybersecurity community. By guarding towards these approaches, or merely shielding records that hackers can make use of, companies can limit their exposure to cyber threats.

Craig Bowen

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